52 Responses

  1. Jarret
    Jarret Published |

    Awesome! You already do some amazing work just by yourself and things will only get better with a strong team to help.

    Reply
  2. Sayontan
    Sayontan Published |

    We want to make themes that are beautiful, functional, and don’t require 300+ theme options to work.

    Being a guy who has written a theme with 400+ options, all I can say is ouch!! :-)

    All the best for DevPress! I will follow it with interest.

    Reply
    1. Travis
      Travis Published |

      Isn’t the whole idea of WordPress to make it easier on users? I think having a theme with 400 options just completely obliterates the purpose behind having WordPress in the first place.

      Not to mention it sounds like it would be reaaally unnecessarily bulky. That’s a ton of extra database calls for each page view! Think about the poor servers who have to host that monstrosity!

      Reply
      1. Sayontan
        Sayontan Published |

        Isn’t the whole idea of WordPress to make it easier on users? I think having a theme with 400 options just completely obliterates the purpose behind having WordPress in the first place.

        You are joking, right? By your argument one could state that having a framework obliterates the purpose behind having WP. If WP is indeed meant to make things easy for users why are there so many frameworks floating around?

        The fact is while WP is a great system for managing content, it does a notoriously poor job of letting you configure most things without writing your own code (either PHP or CSS). Options help you ease the pain of doing the heavy coding as much as a framework does, though both approach the problem from different angles.

        Pick an example – menus. WP introduced them in version 3.0, after not having such capabilities in place all these years. Even with the new feature, though, you cannot do stuff like automatically add new pages into the menu. You have to continue going to the menu configuration pages to explicitly select new pages to appear on this. What is the remedy? You guessed it – options or of course, custom code.

        Take a look at the premium theme market. Most themes offer you lots of options – particularly the ones that let you customize different aspects of look and feel (think Thesis/Headway/Frugal). Besides look and feel there are other aspects that you could control through options, like getting a “blog-style” layout, or a “tiled” layout, or adding featured posts etc. Try doing these without options and you will spend a lot of time writing code.

        You might find having options distasteful, but there are several folks who would pay to be able to do simple to complex things on on their without going through a CSS or PHP or WordPress course first. Stats bear out the fact that most people are either hesitant to code or not capable of doing so. People are still okay with CSS, but they generally balk at the prospect of making PHP edits.

        I think your comment comes from confusing a theme designed specifically for a handful of sites where you would need fewer or no options, with a theme designed for general usage requiring many options. I don’t use Hybrid – I just follow Justin’s blog because of the insanely useful tutorials (something that I liked so much that I even paid to join the theme club without using any of the themes or posting a single support query). It goes without saying that my theme isn’t based on Hybrid.

        The design of a theme essentially comes down to the business model embraced by the developer. Themes like Thesis are sold as “one-size-fits-all” themes, hence they require more options for viability. The developer in such cases offers generic services for the theme and rarely does individual site customization, which is left to the user. On the other hand a developer relying on fewer options typically offers a lot of themes and supports each theme individually, often building custom sites for users.

        That’s a ton of extra database calls for each page view! Think about the poor servers who have to host that monstrosity!

        Far from requiring multiple database calls for each page view, there is really just one call – you can store all options in one array that goes into the DB. Fetch it once, instantiate your variables and be done with it. Why would you make multiple DB calls per page view? That is obtuse.

        With smart design and modular coding you could build a complex system with minimal impact on your memory footprint. More options don’t necessarily equate to poor performance – poor design does.

      2. Sayontan
        Sayontan Published |

        I think your comment comes from confusing a theme designed specifically for a handful of sites where you would need fewer or no options, with a theme designed for general usage requiring many options.

        Sorry, I missed an important phrase in the above. It should read:

        I think your comment comes from confusing a theme designed specifically for a handful of sites, or a framework, where you would need fewer or no options, with a theme designed for general usage requiring many options.

      3. Michael
        Michael Published |

        In brief defense of a lot of options:

        400 theme options doesn’t mean you have to configure each one (at least, it shouldn’t). If a theme works out of the box, but has a lot of features that the tweakers among us can mess around with, I say that’s great. Of course it can be overdone. But it can also be really cool.

      4. Travis
        Travis Published |

        @Sayontan

        Wow, very lengthy response there, friend. Thanks for taking the time to defend your point.

        To put what I’m saying into an example: compare WordPress to Joomla. Joomla has many more out-of-the-box options. Let’s compare the menus for instance:

        Just *defining* a menu in Joomla, besides being on a completely different screen, has 3 options: Unique Name, Title, Description.

        Compare to WordPress that has “Menu Name.”

        Which is less daunting for a user? Which CMS would you say is more popular?

        I would hate for someone to go “ooh WordPress, let’s install it, oh and get this cool theme” then a few months (minutes?) later have the opinion “man, WordPress is so complicated, there’s so many features and options” because they don’t understand the line between WordPress and their theme.

        I understand your vibe. I understand there is a market for a theme like that. I seriously think it just strongly conflicts with the general idea of WordPress, and feel if someone is looking for something like that, they would probably be happier with a different CMS. There is no “one size fits all” imho, no matter how much themes try to make it seem like there is.

  3. joshua
    joshua Published |

    Excellent guys. Collaboration FTW!

    Reply
  4. Travis
    Travis Published |

    Very cool Justin! Look forward to seeing what you guys produce! Any chance of guest tutorials? ;-)

    Reply
  5. DevPress | iamacyborg
    DevPress | iamacyborg at |
  6. Elio
    Elio Published |

    Congratulations Justin! you rock!
    This is going to be a great place for WP community. On top of that, News theme is using Hybrid Core, which is absolutely awesome.
    Can we consider Hybrid Core is now ready for production?

    Reply
  7. DevPress, un nuevo lugar para temas y plugins de WordPress
  8. Seth Shoultes
    Seth Shoultes Published |

    Congrats!

    I am anxious to see what comes of this.

    By the way, how is the forum plugin (using custom post types) coming along?

    Seth

    Reply
  9. Dave Immerz
    Dave Immerz Published |

    I’m really looking forward to this, great news Justin!

    Reply
  10. Stefano
    Stefano Published |

    Justin, it’s a great news!
    I’m going to register right now…

    Stefano

    Reply
  11. Paul
    Paul Published |

    Thank you very much for this wonderful work.

    I’ve been using Hybrid as a “parent theme” for a while now and this “News theme” from “DevPress” is showing me a way to use Hybrid as a “framework.”

    BTW, how to correctly spell “devpress” ?

    Reply
  12. kevin
    kevin Published |

    Wow, i’m gonna check this out, already love your blog for the great tutos. Good luck with that!

    Reply
  13. Bill Tamminga
    Bill Tamminga Published |

    Nice work, Justin. I like the theme. If the specs work for a project I’ll be happy to use it. Congrats…

    Reply
  14. Andrew @ Blogging Guide
    Andrew @ Blogging Guide Published |

    Great news! Actions speak louder than words. This makes it more interesting! It’s like see for yourself.

    Reply
  15. DevPress, un nuevo sitio de referencia para la comunidad de WordPress
  16. Iva
    Iva Published |

    “don’t require 300+ theme options to work”

    I like that part best! Many famous theme frameworks have too much of that.

    Reply
  17. jason peter
    jason peter Published |

    I admire the passion and insistence in your inner heart. Being a developer is always a lonely job! Stay calm and fresh, you will have fascinating work after that! good luck

    Reply
  18. kwpang
    kwpang Published |

    hey that’s is absolutely good news, I has been hunting for new theme for quite a while now.

    Reply
  19. Chris Wheeler
    Chris Wheeler Published |

    Hi. This is a great article bringing some great news. Themes have seemed to have gotten stale, so this is a refreshing development.

    Reply
  20. rob thorpe
    rob thorpe Published |

    Great site, Justin. Interested in seeing what you guys produce.

    Reply
  21. Kelly K
    Kelly K Published |

    wow! awesome! This is great! not much else to say… hehe

    Reply
  22. Heiko
    Heiko Published |

    This is great – keep us posted and can’t wait to see what you guys will come up with.

    Reply
  23. Jesus
    Jesus Published |

    I am always looking for great new wordpress themes for myself and for clients. Thanks for the great resource.

    Reply
  24. Home of cats
    Home of cats Published |

    Another WordPress themes resources. I hope DevPress show the creativity and fully customized in their themes :).

    Reply
  25. elma
    elma Published |

    i believe that DevPress will make a good job. great site!

    Reply
  26. Strony internetowe Pawelec
    Strony internetowe Pawelec Published |

    My adventure with Wordpress started recently. Usually I implemented my own solutions, because ready-made systems such as Wordpress are not sufficiently flexible. Recently I discovered the opportunities offered by Wordpess. With a little effort I can create really good and comprehensive websites! Thanks to you now is more interesting possibilities to create fine wordpress sites.

    Reply
  27. Herlev Rengøring
    Herlev Rengøring Published |

    Im definitely going to check it out. Im looking for a new theme for my wordpress blog.

    Reply
  28. Matias
    Matias Published |

    Great, good job Justin!
    long life to devpress! :P

    Reply
  29. ek yerleştirme
    ek yerleştirme Published |

    Nice work, I like the theme.

    Reply
  30. WhatLiveToday
    WhatLiveToday Published |

    i hope you and your team will be success in the future.. :)

    Reply
  31. SIP
    SIP Published |

    Hey Justin – congrats on DevPress. It looks great. I wish you all the success buddy. Wonderful work.

    Reply
  32. Yellow
    Yellow Published |

    Woohoo, am I too late? This is really cool, have to go to have a look, Justin, really love your work! Keep it up~

    Reply
  33. simplyD
    simplyD Published |

    Congratulations on launching DevPress Justin. You definitely have an incredible grasp of what makes WordPress the pick of the litter when it comes to which way to go for setting up a blog or CMS site!

    Reply
  34. Adam C
    Adam C Published |

    I love it. I could really use some good WP tutorials to learn some new skills. Thanks for the great resource.

    Reply
  35. Ghislain
    Ghislain Published |

    Just one word: excellent!

    I already installed the theme options and I am preparing to install devpress suits me better .. great job guys, a great cheer, it’s clean, friendly, very professional .. I love it! I can not wait to see more.

    I just have a quick question: I try to change the size of the track at 70% but it changes the font size of this site: (Is there a trick to put in place?

    Strongly thereafter, thank you very much guys, I use wordpress a lot and I feel that you will make sparks;)

    Reply
  36. John Landells
    John Landells Published |

    It’s a real shame that DevPress appears to have died already! At least one of the 4 founders has redirect his own theme framework domain to it but hasn’t uploaded any documentation as far as I can see, so support for his theme is now woefully inadequate.

    I applaud you for launching this, but would prefer to see a fully working site this long after launch.

    -John.

    Reply

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