One Response

  1. Ryan Hellyer
    Ryan Hellyer Published |

    Confusion over theme frameworks and parent themes has been rife for as long as I can remember. The concepts are not easy to grok and differences between how you all handle things makes it even more confusing.

    For what it’s worse, I think the way you handle things is by far the most logical (framework wise).

    Reply
  2. Jame LA
    Jame LA Published |

    It’s fun and sad at the same time!

    You’d vote 0/5 for non-coder. As I’m not a coder, but I’m pretty good at front-end coding. In addition, I’m just familiar with PHP so that I always like to create my own custom themes based on others best practiced code batches.

    Even though I’m a non-code, but I know some ways around to plug the pieces of server-sides codes within my front-end languages, HTML & CSS, to make a proper WordPress theme.

    I’d like to know that within my knowledge of these, is it possible for me to create a custom theme bases on Hybrid Core? Is the club membership covers that support?

    Thank you so much for the nice article!

    Jame LA

    Reply
  3. Amen Ra
    Amen Ra Published |

    Hey Justin,

    You are the reason why I have approached WordPress Development the right way. What I have a problem with is some websites and media outlets try to dilute the power of WordPress as a development platform and confuse it’s simplicity to use your knowledge and skills as a developer with the end product which is to make it easy for the non-developers to publish their content on their website after a developer has made it as simple as possible to do so.

    Theme Frameworks are a good example. I hate when someone who is not a developer invests their time and most often the case their money into these goofy frameworks that claim to give them 100% ability to have a custom WordPress site that they like. Then they find out that is not the truth and WordPress becomes the villain instead of those outlets producing this crap getting them blame. So well said and I just want to thank you for pointing out that true WordPress theme Frameworks like yours in my opinion should be for non coders.

    Reply
  4. This Week in WordPress: JJJ Set to Work Full-Time on BuddyPress, and LoopConf Controversy - WPMU DEV
  5. Mike Schinkel
    Mike Schinkel Published |

    Hey Justin,

    Been meaning to comment on this post ever since it landed in my email inbox.

    I get your frustration, but I actually think you bring it on yourself (I'm not criticizing, just offering what I hope is helpful advice.)

    The problem is the terminology. In the software world outside of WordPress the word "Framework" means precisely what Hybrid Core is. But within the WordPress world, thanks to some unfortunate co-oping by successful theme vendors, the term "Theme Framework" means "Parent Theme", full stop, even though I think Hybrid Core came first.

    So you can be stay the course and continue on with your righteous use of the term, or recognize that old truism that begins with: "When in Rome…"

    I'm sure you'd agree the WordPress world is it's own little microcosm. At times "up" means down and "down" means up. So if I were you in this world I'd coin my own term, "reposition" Hybrid Core, and make the term yours.

    Like I said, just trying to be helpful. 🙂

    -Mike

    Reply
  6. lgnicolas
    lgnicolas Published |

    Hi,

    You are the reason why I have approached WordPress Development the right way. What I have a problem with is some websites and media outlets try to dilute the power of WordPress as a development platform and confuse it’s simplicity to use your knowledge and skills as a developer with the end product which is to make it easy for the non-developers to publish their content on their website after a developer has made it as simple as possible to do so.

    Reply
  7. Edward
    Edward Published |

    When you said this, “When we talk about non-coders, we’re talking about people who, at most, may be able to copy and paste some CSS successfully,” I literally spewed wine on my laptop. That’s really funny.

    Anyway, I enjoyed reading your thoughts on the framework debate. It’s something of interest to me of late, as I’m in the process of releasing my own, called Codon. I will call it a framework, but I acknowledge that it may be a loose naming convention.

    Regarding the use of the word “Dashboard” — I must come to its defense. I think at this point, at the very least, it’s a user-friendly term, used somewhat colloquially as an alias for “Admin Home.” So, I’ve used it in documentation and tutorials as follows: Dashboard->Settings->Reading.

    Reply
  8. maç linkleri fan
    maç linkleri fan Published |

    thanks

    Reply
  9. elondon
    elondon Published |

    Well written post on framwork.Very impressive,i always love to go through these kind of posts.

    Reply
  10. Hananto
    Hananto Published |

    Justin please suggest me how to add attachment page to haralampilux theme? i’ll sparate the attachment page from single(dot)php. Is it using the same way like ordinary wp theme where not using Hybrid Framework.

    Sorry for My English

    Reply
  11. Luigi
    Luigi Published |

    hi, interesting and clear article.

    I would like to ask what are differences between “wordpress premium theme” and wordpress theme framework “parent” (themes definited as framework but that are a advanced parent theme)?

    Reply
  12. Luigi
    Luigi Published |

    it’s right to say that wootheme respect the definitions of this post?

    i ask this becouse some of woo themes are child theme (Canvas Themes) of parent theme (Canvas) which in turn are build with woo framework.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

By submitting a comment here you grant this site a perpetual license to reproduce your words and name/Web site in attribution.

Please use your real name or a pseudonym (i.e., pen name, alias, nom de plume) when commenting. If you add your site name, company name, or something completely random, I'll likely change it to whatever I want.

css.php