25 Responses

  1. Anonymous
    Anonymous Published |

    Too much poor directory, I do not like, allthough is better than the old.

    Reply
  2. Ian Stewart
    Ian Stewart Published |

    I threw all my themes up there first thing this morning. I’m not sure how I’ll handle support requests through the dot org forums. Small stuff I might answer there but I’d rather direct everything to my own forums. We’ll see.

    Reply
  3. Ian Stewart
    Ian Stewart Published |

    1. What effect will this have on the way we currently get themes?

    99% of WordPress users will get their WordPress themes from the official directory.

    2. Do you see this as a step in the right direction?

    Yes. This is good news for WordPress users. It makes it easier for theme to find new themes. I really like the Plugin directory. It’s rare that I use a plugin that doesn’t come from there. The same will probably hold true for themes for most people.

    3. How will this change (if at all) the premium theme market (I imagine this is on a few people’s minds)?

    It will probably not be good for the premium theme market.

    4. Will this make it harder for new theme authors to get their themes out who don’t want to use the directory?

    Probably. Will WeblogToolsCollection continue announcing new themes when I see the latest themes pop up on my WordPress dashboard (speculation)?

    Reply
  4. Ian Stewart
    Ian Stewart Published |

    It makes it easier for theme to find new themes

    Oops. I mean this: It’ll make it easier for users to find new themes …

    Reply
  5. The Elder
    The Elder Published |

    It’ll make it easier for new users to find themes and get acquainted with WP and the Community. Experienced users however are propably far more selective and have their certain places on the Internet where they are comfortable eg. justintadlock.com

    It’s pretty obvious to me that you don’t need another download/support place than what you already have (the No. of downloads here makes that self evident). You would not benefit from it, but rather duplicate your work and support.

    Maybe the WP-Org should rather administer “proven” WP authors and developers rather than throw a million themes in one spot. The WP-Org could thus, for the benefit of users, guide them to “safe” places for themes and plugins. An administrative hell (pardon my french) but hey, that’s just part business.

    Reply
  6. Ian Stewart
    Ian Stewart Published |

    I just like to watch how these things unfold

    Me too. There must be something wrong with us.

    Reply
  7. Ptah Dunbar
    Ptah Dunbar Published |

    What effect will this have on the way we currently get themes?

    It’ll serve as a central place for dot org users to get their themes with confidence and that the themes are clean (security wise) and been through a screening process. This would also probably be the start of automattic theme upgrades like plugins. I think this would develop into a huge chuck of traffic for Theme Authors as the Plugin directory is for Plugin Authors.

    Do you see this as a step in the right direction?

    Of course. Easier way to find (hopefully) great themes.

    How will this change (if at all) the premium theme market (I imagine this is on a few people’s minds)?

    I’d imagine it would probably ‘weed’ out a lot of so called ‘premium theme’ authors to only those who figure out a way to deal with this central theme directory.
    I’d say, if premium theme authors take this with a positive light, they’ll probably release some more ‘freemium’ themes to market their premium themes.
    So it can either be a good thing or a bad. Oh, and then there’s ugly which would totally erase them of them map.

    Will this make it harder for new theme authors to get their themes out who don’t want to use the directory?

    I’d say it will be a problem when new wordpress dot org users don’t know any of the rockstars who’ve been pushing theming to a higher level (Options!). But I wouldn’t worry just yet, it all depends on the quality of free themes that enters in the directory. Hopefully it won’t turn out like the last one.

    Reply
  8. Missy
    Missy Published |

    One of my biggest pet peeves with the old WP Theme Gallery, was the inability to search by date. I didn’t/don’t want an old theme, or an incomptabible theme.

    Hopefully this NEW! gallery, allows for much better searching.

    Reply
  9. Matthew
    Matthew Published |

    I think this is very good for people who are new to WordPress. Finding a quality theme when you are new to everything WordPress is, or at least it was for me, challenging and somewhat disheartening. Google “WordPress themes” and you get back millions of results. That is a bit much for a lot of people to deal with when they don’t have enough knowledge to help them sift through it all.

    I would expect that more experienced WordPress users will still find the best themes, whether at the new directory or elsewhere.

    Reply
  10. jez
    jez Published |

    I am not sure whether I am liking the GPL license or not.
    It is surely a great place for distribution, but then again there are quite many regulations to comply.
    I’ve submitted my Rainbow Feather theme, however I just released that is says “CC 3.0″ in the footer and style.css – wonder what their reaction will be.

    I am not overly sure that the GPL is the right way to go.
    If we, as designers, are to release our hard-unpaid work for free, we surely do want some credit for it?

    Reply
  11. Jacob Santos
    Jacob Santos Published |

    @Jez

    I’m not sure what regulations you are talking about. GPL only handles distribution and you can still sell GPL code. The only problem is that once the other person has that theme, he can then resell it. So I mean, you’ll have to have a license clause, which might violate the GPL, that they acknowledge that they can’t resell the theme with your pictures and styles or as is. You won’t be able to protect your code, that is immediately GPL, but you can still protect your images, custom JS, and maybe CSS.

    All themes used by WordPress are immediately GPL or GPL compatible. This is from most themes using the Template Tags API, you have a part of WordPress inside your theme therefore you inherit the license. If you were to create your own API and be completely separated from the WordPress API, then you would not be required to be GPL.

    Reply
  12. J Mehmett
    J Mehmett Published |

    1. What effect will this have on the way we currently get themes?
    In my opinion this will not make any great effect on the way users get themes. It may effect, however, the future WP theme users.

    There’re only 9 themes as the time of writing. No more old theme authors hurried on there.
    2. Do you see this as a step in the right direction?
    Of course, yes. WordPress should take this step long ago.
    3. How will this change (if at all) the premium theme market (I imagine this is on a few people’s minds)?
    Not sure… Let’s see it.
    4. Will this make it harder for new theme authors to get their themes out who don’t want to use the directory?
    Yes… This will make them obey GPL and will force them put their works on WP.org

    Reply
  13. Squawk
    Squawk Published |

    1. What effect will this have on the way we currently get themes?

    Very little. Newbie Wordpress users will go there the same as I did in the beginning. They will take what is available and be happy. If (big if) they stay around for any appreciable amount of time I think most serious bloggers end up searching out the “Jusitn Tadlocks” out there for themes that look good, are functional, have real support.

    2. Do I see it as a step in the right direction?

    Sure. Why not? In the spirit of open source it does give a central “trusted” space for the newbie to get their themes, give burgeoning theme developers a place to get immediate feedback on their work.

    3. How will this change (if at all) the premium theme market (I imagine this is on a few people’s minds)?

    Competition is competition. Premium themes are for folks like myself that are serious bloggers that have blogged for more than one year. Comparitively speaking the market for premium is rather small. Free Blogger or Wordpress suit most wannabe bloggers. Those that try to make the leap to managing their own system hang around long enough for their webhost subscription to go away. I did not go premium till “my favorite” theme was broke by needs and upgrades. Need is the primary reason people buy premium. Define that need and you will become a rich man.

    4. Will this make it harder for new theme authors to get their themes out who don’t want to use the directory?

    Yup

    Reply
  14. Anonymous
    Anonymous Published |

    1. What effect will this have on the way we currently get themes?
    A lot of the previous comments has nailed this I think. The group should be separated into new users, and experienced users. It’s a fantastic resource for the new users right of the bat, and it can evolve into a fantastic resources for experienced users.

    2. Do you see this as a step in the right direction?
    Yep, it will be nice to see the theme part evolve in the same direction as the plugins have, with auto-update. Now we just need to do something about localization, since not all sites on the big internet is in English :-)

    3. How will this change (if at all) the premium theme market (I imagine this is on a few people’s minds)?
    Not much I gather. Especially if the cool freemium themebuilders like yourself don’t put the themes up in the theme directory. Don’t get me wrong, I understand your stance, and I love coming here on this site, but on the other hand it’s a free outlet for your very cool themes, and it would also drive alot of traffic to your site.

    I actually don’t see why you couldn’t say that all support-issues should be answered in your forum, that’s what a lot of the plugin-authors do.

    4. Will this make it harder for new theme authors to get their themes out who don’t want to use the directory?
    Yes I think so, the directory will serve as a de facto standard of Wordpress themes which will make it even harder for newcomers to enter the market.

    Reply
  15. jez
    jez Published |

    Justin,

    I am not yet digging the GPL license- what is the principle it operates on?
    So far what I have read is that images, css and javascript as well as custom code can be “claimed as one’s creative property”, while the wordpress functions (such as listing pages, the loop, etc) is GPL and not ‘owned’ (so to say) by anyone?

    For instance, if I were to release a theme under GPL, wouldnt that mean people could just rip and sell it without giving me a chance of getting back to them at all?

    I can understand the argument that themes, as a ‘inherited product of wordpress’ must be licensed as GPL, however as a designer without any great knowledge of licensing I am stumbling to grasp “what exactly” this means.

    Maybe someone can put it dead-stupid in a single sentence.
    I see no great point in spending numerous of hours working on a free design (which I loved to do for the community) if someone can just come around and “claim it”, do stuff and re-sell it.

    Reply
  16. jez
    jez Published |

    I didn’t mean to kill the discussion here, so can anyone simply it?

    Reply
  17. jez
    jez Published |

    thanks for your reply justin.
    Currently I see no point in putting much effort in launching additional free themes to the community (e.g. my past themes were downloaded 225,000+ times) if people can just come around, copy and redistribute them on “premium” sites while I intended to have them spread for free.

    I believe that with this license either little “upper segment and ‘made with love'” themes will appear in the wordpress theme repository (thus quality will suffer and wordpress will become similar to ‘blogger'(com)) or only designers with “additional income” or that are total angels to society will be posting there.

    That’s my take on the situation and I am probably not the only one believing that for simplicity and attribution sake themes should not be GPL but CC (SA-BY and/or ND).

    Reply
  18. groovy
    groovy Published |

    spot on Justin. What you have established here is a benchmark for other providers that needs to be followed not diluted.

    Reply
  19. Anonymous
    Anonymous Published |

    @groovy totally agree!

    Reply
  20. milo
    milo Published |

    What effect will this have on the way we currently get themes?
    Judging by the download numbers it’ll be the only repository,
    however the no1, Tarski works buggy, so you can’t tell for sure.

    Do you see this as a step in the right direction?
    Yes, it was time to do so after themes.wordpress.net died,
    however I have no clue why they just don’t take all my themes over it… (themes.wordpress.net/author/milo317/)

    How will this change (if at all) the premium theme market?
    Premium will last, but Collis might kill them with his new FlashDen alike theme market. Just think of the followers of his other sites and check FlashDen, then you might have an idea.

    Will this make it harder for new theme authors to get their themes out who don’t want to use the directory?
    Yepp, definitely, if you don’t have a “name”, but then again there is WLTC for PR work.

    Reply
  21. Joni Mueller
    Joni Mueller Published |

    I’m a little late jumping on this bandwagon, but here goes.
    1. What effect will this have on the way we currently get themes? Newbies to WP and to blogging in general will use the new repository as a jumping off point. This hopefully will stop a large percentage of the current problems I see on the WP Support Forums. A newbie getting his hands on a complex theme or a badly designed or structured theme and trying to work with it. At least we can be assured of some amount of functionality out of the box. On the other hand, someone who knows his or her way around CSS and HTML and who is just new to WP itself might go there and grab a theme or two, but likely won’t be content with it for long and will either search out independent theme sites (premium or otherwise) or roll his own.
    2. Do you see this as a step in the right direction? I think it’s a big improvement over the former system and insisting on themes that conform to the new WP structure (e.g., tags, widgets, image styling) is a good move.
    3. How will this change (if at all) the premium theme market (I imagine this is on a few people’s minds)? I think there will always be a market for premium themes if they are well designed and offer uniqueness that you can’t get elsewhere. There are a handful of premium theme authors (Brian Gardner comes immediately to mind, along with you, Justin) who consistently supply excellent themes well worth their asking price. Others are just, pardon my candor, trash.
    4. Will this make it harder for new theme authors to get their themes out who don’t want to use the directory? I
    think if you market your themes properly, you can get noticed without having to post your theme(s) to the directory. We had about a dozen themes up at themes.wordpress.net, but as WP continued its furious upgrade pace, our themes needed upgrading and we just never were able to keep up. Now with the new directory, there’s a chance for us to polish up our old themes to comport with WP 2.6 and beyond. And we’ll likely do that for a handful of themes, just to get our name out there. As for the GPL license issues, I’m with you. I am not too keen on turning my work over to someone so that it can be bastardized and passed off as another’s work. That’s against the spirit of what free themes is about, at lesat in my mind. So we’ll probably put out just a few themes in the hopes that those might drive theme-goers to our site for other of our themes. I can understand why the themes in the new repository have to be GPL. That doesn’t mean I have to like it.

    Great post, Justin, and thanks for giving us something else to chew on. :)

    Reply
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